I studied Mathematics at the University of Oxford, then undertook a MSc in Computing and Information Systems at Ulster University. I worked in the charitable sector for 15 years, latterly as an IT trainer (CompTia/Microsoft Certified Professional) working with adults returning to education. I then undertook a PhD in Bioinformatics at Ulster University using data mining and molecular dynamics modeling to predict the three-dimensional structure of proteins. This was followed by bioinformatics post-doctoral research at Ulster University and Queen’s University of Belfast. This work involved the application of mathematics, statistics and computing to the stratification of patients based on prognosis, using discovery and classification/machine learning techniques. As a Lecturer in Computational Biology at Ulster University with the Stratified Medicine Centre, I taught students to use and apply R (statistical programming framework) within the context of mining patient datasets to extract novel biological insights.

I am currently a Lecturer in Translational Cancer Bioinformatics at the Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology at Queen’s University Belfast, working in inflammatory disease and cancer. I lead a bioinformatics research group with a focus on developing novel computational methods to process and integrate patient data to help biologists and clinicians understand what treatments work best, and understand the reasons why, for different groups of patients.

I am also the Course Director for the MSc Bioinformatics and Computational Genomics, a conversion course, which equips students with the statistics and programming skills required to analyse high-dimensional datasets. In particular, I have developed an e-learning module to facilitate delivery of statistical programming training for non-technical graduates.